Sunday, April 23, 2017

Salvia Sample Knit

I was contacted this past week to see if I would be interested in knitting a sample for the Unique Sheep using a new yarn.  The pattern looked like an easy and quick knit, so I said yes.  The yarn arrived on this past Thursday and I caked it all up yesterday morning and got the pattern all set up in knitCompanion.  I started out knitting on US 6 needles, but decided after looking at the pictures and checking my yarn usage to go up to US 7 (the pattern suggests either size - it also has a garter stitch swatch, ugh).  The pictures indicated that the shawl was more loosely knit and more drapey than I was getting with US 6.



Pattern:  Salvia by Heidi Alander
Yarn:  Not really sure, the label says The Unique Sheep Rare Breed, it's a silk wool blend with 4 plies
Needle:  US 7 (4.5 mm)

Falling Leaves Shrug - Skein 3 Side 1

I finished up skein 3 on the first side this week and have just started skein 4.  I'm getting some interesting pooling instead of the more typical striping that occurs when knitting a narrower piece.  It is a real challenge getting a good picture, the knitting tends to scrunch and I can't stretch it out too much for fear of the stitches coming off the needles.  This was the best that I could do today.

Pattern:  Falling Leaves Shrug by Carolyn Blakelock
Yarn:  The Unique Sheep Verve in Verdandi
Needle:  US 5 (3.75 mm)

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Falling Leaves Shrug - Skein 2 Side 1

After finishing the central panel I continued on with the remains of skein 1, joining skein 2.  I worked the initial pick up and then my increase row, did some counting, did some math, and started working the Falling Leaves lace pattern.  I am not quite half way through the second repeat of the chart and am about to join the third skein.  I think I have figured out what I want to do to enable folks to make their own adjustments.  It will most likely mean that I will have several charts to choose from, depending upon how many stitches are picked up and how that works out with the pattern repeat.  I thought the rows would go pretty slow - after all, I am working across 235 stitches, but the lace pattern is simple and easy to memorize and it goes pretty fast.

Pattern:  Falling Leaves Shrug by Carolyn Blakelock
Yarn:  The Unique Sheep Verve in Verdandi
Needle:  US 5 (3.75 mm)

Monday, April 17, 2017

Falling Leaves Shrug - Central Panel Done

I finished up the central panel tonight.  Not the best picture, but I had to use flash.  I did 26 repeats of the Lattice Lace chart, which equates to 313 rows.  When I did the first pick-up in the side loops I picked up 157 stitches.  I still have a few feet of skein 1 left.  I'll join the second skein and work the increase row, and then figure out the numbers for the Falling Leaves chart.  I'm going to have to modify the chart to be adaptable depending upon the number of stitches picked up.

Pattern:  Falling Leaves Shrug by Carolyn Blakelock
Yarn:  The Unique Sheep Verve in Verdandi
Needle:  US 5 (3.75 mm)

Sunday, April 16, 2017

Virginia's Charivari Shrug - One Side Done

I finished up the white stripe on the first side, so the shrug is basically half done.  I have figured out an easy set of modifications to enable folks to utilize as much of their yarn as possible while minimizing the risk of running short.  Basically there are three variations of the garter and stockinette stitch combo that can be worked:

20 rows:  6 rows of garter, 8 rows of stockinette, 6 rows of garter
16 rows:  4 rows of garter, 8 rows of stockinette, 4 rows of garter
14 rows:  4 rows of garter, 6 rows of stockinette, 4 rows of garter.

On the second side I will be keeping a row by row record of my yarn usage so I can determine a stitches per gram for both the garter and stockinette sections so that folks can figure out their approximate yarn usage depending upon how many rows they knit on the central panel.

I also have to provide a formula for determining how many stitches you need to keep for the opening to make sure that the shrug fits properly.  I'm thinking that it should be based upon the width of the shoulders plus the distance from the nape of the neck to the natural waist.

Pattern:  Traveling Zebra by Louise Robert
Yarn:  Bis-sock by Biscotte & Cie
Needle:  US 2.5 (3 mm) & US 4 (3.5 mm)

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Virginia's Charivari Shrug - Three Stripes Done

Third stripe done.  These actually go pretty fast, despite those long ruffled rows.  I worked the two extra rows of garter before the ruffled section again.  I've got some ideas on easy modifications to use more or less yarn depending upon how long the central panel is that I'll put into the shrug pattern write up.  It'll mean folks will need to weight their skeins and keep track of their yarn usage, but it is pretty straightforward and should prevent any awkward surprises.


Pattern:  Traveling Zebra by Louise Robert
Yarn:  Bis-sock by Biscotte & Cie
Needle:  US 2.5 (3 mm) & US 4 (3.5 mm)

Monday, April 10, 2017

Virginia's Charivari Shrug - Two Stripes Done

My brain wasn't up to working on lace on Sunday so instead I worked on Virginia's Charivari shrug and finished up the second stripe.  I did a slight modification of the pattern on this one.  It had always bothered me that the garter ridges on either side of the ruffle were not the same - 4 rows below the ruffle, 6 rows above, so I took a little gamble and did 2 extra rows before I started the ruffle.  I really like how it came out - I am a bit of a symmetry nut.

Pattern:  Traveling Zebra by Louise Robert
Yarn:  Bis-sock by Biscotte & Cie
Needle:  US 2.5 (3 mm) & US 4 (3.5 mm)

Falling Leaves Shrug - Central Panel Started

After swatching on Friday I cast on the central panel on Saturday.  The lace pattern is from a stitch library, but it was only given as written directions, so the first thing I had to do was chart it.  This wasn't quite as simple as it sounds as the stitch count varies.  When I charted it just based upon the written instructions the chart didn't really look like what was coming out in the knitting.  After working the pattern for a few repeats I realized what was going on and was able to add in the non-knit stitches in the appropriate places to make the chart look like the knitting.  I was pretty well chuffed with myself for figuring it out.  My plan is to basically use up the entire skein for the center panel, but in the pattern I'm including directions for adjusting the size and figuring out what you can do with the yarn that you have.

Pattern:  Falling Leaves Shrug by Carolyn Blakelock
Yarn:  The Unique Sheep Verve in Verdandi
Needle:  US 5 (3.75 mm)

Saturday, April 8, 2017

Falling Leaves Shrug - Swatching Lace

The really exciting development is that I'm working on a design.  The basic construction is inspired by the Traveling Shawl pattern, but I wanted to do it in lace, and a Unique Sheep Gradiance.  I've been looking for suitable lace motifs for a little while now, and finally found them this week.  Interestingly enough, I found them in the very first knitting book that I bought How to Knit by Debbie Bliss.  I pulled my copy out to give to a friend that wants to learn, and ordered another copy for myself after leafing through it and reminding myself what a nice book it is.  Last night I pulled out my bag of leftover balls of Verve yarn and knit up a sample.

There were a couple of things I was figuring out - the biggest was how to work the pick for the lace panels that come off the sides of the central panel.  The bottom panel was knit after picking up a stitch for every other row (one stitch per slipped stitch side loop).  That was obviously too tight.  When I started the top panel I initially picked up two stitches in each side loop - knit-front-back - but after working a couple of rows it was obvious that there would be too many stitches to block out properly so I frogged and redid the start.  This time I did an initial pick up of one stitch per side loop, then on the return wrong side row I increased every other stitch, but using the knit-front-slip-back.  I also played around with my double decreases.  I like the central-double-decrease as it gives a more distinct line.  I'm not sure if I'm going to include any beads.

The yarn I'm going to use is the first shipment for The Unique Sheep's Mythical Shawls Club.  I had done the test knit and didn't feel like knitting the shawl again, but I love the colorway, and it was, in fact, part of the inspiration for this design.

Pattern:  Falling Leaves Shrug by Carolyn Blakelock
Yarn:  The Unique Sheep Verve in Verdandi
Needle:  US 5 (3.75 mm)

Dreamy Adalia - Progress Check

I have also been making progress on my Dreamy Adalia.  The pattern is pretty straight forward at this point.  I will admit that I didn't think the pattern was written as clearly, or charted as clearly, as it could have been, but fortunately there is a great picture of the back in the pattern PDF that I could zoom in on to make sure I understood what was really going on. 


Pattern:  Adalia by Jennifer Wood
Yarn:  Spirit Trail Fiberworks Verdande in Daydream
Needles:  US 6 (4 mm)

Virginia's Charivari Shrug - One Stripe Done

I finished up the first ruffled stripe this week.  Wonderful mindless knitting.  I tried a variation on the knit-front-back that is going around, instead of knitting into the back of the stitch you put your needle like you're going to knit into the back of the stitch but just slip the stitch onto the needle instead.  It is called knit-front-slip-back.  It gives a cleaner increase, you don't get that little bar.

Pattern:  Traveling Zebra by Louise Robert
Yarn:  Bis-sock by Biscotte & Cie
Needle:  US 2.5 (3 mm) & US 4 (3.5 mm)

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Virginia's Charivari Shrug - Center Panel Done

I stayed home from work today.  There is a bug going around and I think it was trying to get me, so I decided to stay home and rest and hopefully kick it before it sets in.  My mind was pretty fuzzy so it wasn't up for working on the Dreamy Adalia (all those cables) instead I worked on this and read and watched some TCM.

I didn't make it to 480 rows though, only 456.  That gives me 228 stitches to pick along the side.  I'll still keep 120 stitches for the central opening, so that will mean I will graft 54 stitches for the sleeves.

Pattern:  Traveling Zebra by Louise Robert
Yarn:  Bis-sock by Biscotte & Cie
Needle:  US 2.5 (3 mm) & US 4 (3.5 mm)

Sunday, April 2, 2017

Dreamy Adalia - Sleeves separated out

I've also been working on my Dreamy Adalia now that my deadline projects are done.  It had been so long since I had worked on it I had to do some reviewing of the pattern.  I was a bit thrown at first by the back increases and the green stitches, but I did eventually figure it out.  I cast on 5 stitches instead of 3 for the underarms.  Three stitches just didn't seem like enough.  Thanks to a demonstration by Merike at The Unique Sheep Retreat I am knitting cables without a cable needle!
Buying the KC pattern set up was definitely worth it for this pattern.


Pattern:  Adalia by Jennifer Wood
Yarn:  Spirit Trail Fiberworks Verdande in Daydream
Needles:  US 6 (4 mm)

Virginia's Charivari Shrug

Now that I've finished up a couple of my deadline projects I started another shrug.  I need to write up the pattern so I figure I'll knit a couple in the process.  I bought two more Charivari Paintbox sets, one for my sister and one for myself.
I'm not using a row counter as I go, because when I've tried that in the past I found myself forgetting to click the counter between rows.  Instead I periodically count the number of slipped-stitch loops and when I have ten I put in a locking stitch marker.  The picture above shows the stitch markers.  When I pick up stitches I'll go through both loops, as the markers do.

Pattern:  Traveling Zebra by Louise Robert
Yarn:  Bis-sock by Biscotte & Cie
Needle:  US 2.5 (3 mm) & US 4 (3.5 mm)

Morphology - Done!

I took this project along with me to The Unique Sheep retreat, figuring it would be easy car knitting.  I finished it up while we were in Harriman, Tennessee.
It's a good thing, too, as the next shipment of the Rockin' Sock Club has shipped and I'm way behind on knitting them.  Here are a couple more photos.
I'm not quite sure how to wear these.  I just wore it around my neck this past Friday.  This photo shows the colors and stitches the best.

Pattern:  Morphology by A. Karen Alfke
Yarn:  Blue Moon Fiber Arts Socks that Rock Lightweight in Sprinkles and Shannanogins
Needle:  US 6 (4 mm)

Saturday, March 25, 2017

Watermelon Shrug - Almost Done

This project has been mostly done since February 4, but I realized after I wore it that the sleeves were different lengths, so I set it aside while I worked on a couple of other projects knowing that I would have to come back and fix it.  I finally got around to fixing it today.  I undid the bind off on the central opening, raveled back and picked up the stitches, then I undid the sleeves, one at a time.  I had done a three needle bind off, which I had decided was too tight, so I decided to replace that with grafting.  Once I got both of the sleeves done I redid the knitting around the opening and did the final bind off.  I'm probably going to work some cuffs to add a little length to the sleeves.  This one did not come out as long as the Gazania Shrug.

Pattern:  Traveling Zebra by Louise Robert modified to be a shrug
Yarn:  Bis-sock by Biscotte & Cie
Needle:  US 2.5 (3 mm) & US 4 (3.5 mm)

Morphology - Nothing Left But The Blues

Having finished my test knit, my sample knit, and putting together the first 6 of the 12 clues for the latest Unique Sheep MKAL (The House at Pooh Corner) I picked this project back up.  It is pretty mindless and I don't even need to use a counter - just count the bars from slipping with the yarn in front.  With a little steady work I've made it through the section that alternates the two colors and am in the home stretch - 28 rows of the blues.  I'm not entirely happy with the color switches (they aren't horrible, but they aren't perfect), but I'm hoping that once the piece is blocked they won't be too noticeable.

Pattern:  Morphology by A. Karen Alfke
Yarn:  Blue Moon Fiber Arts Socks that Rock Lightweight in Sprinkles and Shannanogins
Needle:  US 6 (4 mm)

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Basic Toe Up Socks 6 - One Sock Done

I keep a small project bag in my work bag for emergency knitting.  I've been keeping a sock project in there because it is easy to pick up and put down.  I started this one on the drive back from our annual Christmas trip to Florida.  I finished up the foot on December 28 and it has taken me all this time to finish the rest of the sock and then snap a quick picture (not the best, I know, but you get the idea).  I haven't had much knitting at work time - no endless telecons to knit to, but I have been doing some reading of technical documents, and knitting while I read always helps me stay focused.  I finished up the knitting on Monday and did the bind off tonight.  I haven't posted much this past month, but I've been working on a test knit, which I couldn't post about, and a sample knit, which I somehow never got around to posting about.  It's been one of those months.   But we should get back to our regularly scheduled program.

There are some exciting things on the horizon.  Biscotte has asked me to write up my shrug modification to the Traveling Zebra pattern, and they are even paying me for it!  They sent me a beautiful yarn pack to knit the sample in.  More on that later.  I've also been playing around with some design ideas, and I need to start my next Tudor Roses project.  So stay tuned - much yarny goodness to come.

Pattern:  Basic Toe-Up Sock from Custom Socks by Kate Atherley
Yarn:  Biscotte & Cie Felix
Needle:  US 1 (2.25 mm)

Saturday, March 18, 2017

Hale-Bopp MKAL - Done!

All done.  I took a blocking picture this morning before unpinning it.  I did not put any pins along the top edge, just at the top corners, and in each of the picots.
I worked the last wrong side row in the main color (the Truffle) and then did the bind off in the Arctic.  I used a different color bead for the picots, one that went with the Arctic colorway - blue lined aqua AB.

Pattern:  Hale-Bopp MKAL by Ambah O'Brien
Yarn:  Zen Yarn Garden Serenity 20
Needle:  US 5 (3.75 mm)

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Hale-Bopp Clue 4

It's been a little while, but I've been busy finishing up a test knit, and also working on a sample knit (more about that later).  The final clue for the Hale-Bopp MKAL came out last week. As most predicted, it involved picking up stitches and working the lace motif.  If you recall, at the end of Clue 3 we were left in this configuration.
With 280 stitches still on the needle on the right, and the comet tail going off to the left and it was along that comet tail that the stitches had to be picked up.  My usual method of picking up stitches is 2 stitches for every 3 rows.  The pattern called for picking up 3 stitches for every 4 rows.  Okay, I could work with that, easy enough on the sections that are lace - those are done in stockinette - but what about the sections done in garter stitch?  Typically, when I pick up stitches on garter stitch, I pick them up every other row.  The first time I picked up the stitches, I did it that way, but then got nervous about not having enough fabric in the edging to block without overly stretching the edging.  So, I ripped back and tried to do it per the pattern.  I got seven rows into the lace and noticed this happening.
It was really noticeable on the slip stitch section.
Ugh.  I didn't like that at all.  So I thought about it, and slept on it, and decided to rip back and try again this morning.  On the lace sections I picked up as I normally would, but on the garter and slip stitch sections (which is worked on a garter stitch base, with the addition of slipping stitches to pull the fabric in even more) I picked up a stitch every other row.  Then, on the purl row back I increased by purling into the front and back of stitches to get to the right number in each section (based on the 3 stitches for 4 rows rule).  I am much happier with the result.
And here is the slip stitch section.
Much neater.  Oh, and I won a prize in the clue 3 thread - a free pattern - way cool and very exciting.  Now, I just need to complete clue 4 before the end of the weekend.

Pattern:  Hale-Bopp MKAL by Ambah O'Brien
Yarn:  Zen Yarn Garden Serenity 20
Needle:  US 5 (3.75 mm)

Sunday, February 26, 2017

Hale-Bopp - Clue 3

I flew through clue 3.  I worked the first garter section Friday night, but then was trying to figure out how I was going to stay on track for the other garter and slip stitch sections because each distinct row was only given once, and then the other rows would be "Rep row x", and then there were repeats, and some of them were partial repeats.  When I woke up Saturday morning I had the solution.  I created tables for each of the garter and slip stitch sections in Excel, copying and pasting the full instructions for each row and also for each repeat.  I also include the stitch counts for each row.  In the end I had complete tables that I could just work through without having to try to remember where I was, or mark something on the paper, or flip counters backwards and forwards.  I put the tables into a Word file, where they conveniently each fit on one page, and exported that to PDF.  Then I pulled the PDF into my knitCompanion Hale-Bopp project and created Text Objects of each of the tables and used the Text Overlay feature so each row would be highlighted in turn.  It made knitting the clue carefree.  I still had to refer to the clue file to make sure I had the order of each of the sections right.  The lace chart I also pulled into knitCompanion.

I was a little nervous as I neared the end of the clue that I would run out of the Main Color (the brown) and the Contrast Color 1 (the variegated), but I made it through with 6.1 grams and 7.7 grams left, respectfully.

Here are a couple more beauty shots.
The comet tail wraps all the way around.

Pattern:  Hale-Bopp MKAL by Ambah O'Brien
Yarn:  Zen Yarn Garden Serenity 20
Needle:  US 5 (3.75 mm)

Hale Bopp - Clue 2

I really wanted to get Clue 2 done before Clue 3 came out so last week I ignored my other projects and focused on this one.  I will admit that it is a bit addictive.  I like the colors and textures and how they work together and on the garter and slip stitch sections I can actually read while knitting.  Once again I figured out the stitch counts for all of the sections so I could make sure that I stayed on track.

Pattern:  Hale-Bopp MKAL by Ambah O'Brien
Yarn:  Zen Yarn Garden Serenity 20
Needle:  US 5 (3.75 mm)

Morphology - Progress Check

I have been using this project as a default easy project when I don't feel like working on anything complicated.  The picture above shows where I was last weekend.  I do like the tighter tension I am getting on the smaller needles, even though it means I don't get the color pooling that I was getting on the first go around.  I know some folks don't like color pooling, but I always have.  This past week I got to the point where the second color is introduced.
The pattern indicates that you shouldn't cut the yarn between the stripes, but I'm having a hard time figuring out how to carry the blue up without creating distortions.  I screwed up when I switched back to the yellow skein and ended up cutting the blue to fix the problem.  I have several more opportunities to figure it out.

Pattern:  Morphology by A. Karen Alfke
Yarn:  Blue Moon Fiber Arts Socks that Rock Lightweight in Sprinkles and Shannanogins
Needle:  US 6 (4 mm)

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Morphology - Take Two

I knit a few more rows on this project on Tuesday and found myself growing more and more concerned with what I perceived as a mis-match between the yarn thickness and the needle size.  I found myself playing with the knitting, pulling it and stretching it and worrying about the stability of the resulting fabric.
What really worried me was the size of the purl bumps.  That is a lot of yarn sitting there, and a lot of potential for stretching.  There were a couple of statements in the pattern directions that I found particularly disturbing:

"Linen stitch pulls in dramatically as the work progresses".

This would be due to the bar of the slipped stitch, and would be exacerbated by a tight knitter.  I found myself working tighter than I typically do, just because of my psychological discomfort with the larger needles.

"You will find that the resulting fabric is stable when dry, but quite flexible when wet. You may find that with wear, the fabric may grow in circumference; with wet-blocking you can shape the fabric back to its original proportions."

These statements really got me wondering, so I dug through my stash for more "emergency" sock yarn skeins and knit another swatch on US 6 (4 mm) needles.  My needle size choice was driven by a simple consideration of the linen stitch - each stitch has to span two rows, so I used a needle size that was twice the size of what I might have used in a normal stockinette stitch garment.

The original swatch is on the left, the new swatch is on the right.  The original swatch is 32 stitches by 44 rows, binding off on row 45.  For the new swatch I cast on 32 stitches but bound off on row 44 because I didn't feel like cracking open a new "emergency" skein to finish off row 44 and bind off.  The new swatch was blocked to 5.5" wide by 4" tall, but it rebounded to 5" wide by 3.75" tall.  The original swatch was blocked to 6.5" wide by 4" tall.  The width rebounded to 6".  The new swatch still has some stretch, but not to the extent of the original swatch, which has considerable stretch, especially in the width.  Both have nice drape - so despite going down on the needle size, my new swatch is not stiff as a board.  You could get it there, if you went down even further on the needle size, but that was not my goal - I just wanted a garment that would have some stability.
If you look at the back side, you can again see the extra fiber in the purl bumps in the original swatch.  The other advantage of going down on the needle size is that I don't need to work a super stretchy cast on and bind off.

So, I'm going to frog what I've got and cast on again on the US 6 needles.  I've got to say, I love the colors.  They just make me smile.

Pattern:  Morphology by A. Karen Alfke
Yarn:  Blue Moon Fiber Arts Socks that Rock Lightweight in Sprinkles and Shannanogins
Needle:  US 6 (4 mm)

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Hale-Bopp MKAL - Clue 1 Redone

After fixing the slip stitch section in Clue 1, I finally got around to re-knitting the lace section to finish up Clue 1.  I can now redo the garter stitch section, which I'm looking forward to as I can read as I knit and I'm in the middle of a thumping good read.  I'm glad I ripped this back and fixed it.  Now I just have to decide what to do on my test knit.

Pattern:  Hale-Bopp MKAL by Ambah O'Brien
Yarn:  Zen Yarn Garden Serenity 20
Needle:  US 5 (3.75 mm)

Sunday, February 12, 2017

Morphology - Cast On

Some years back I caught the Sock Club bug that was going around and joined several - CookieA, Janel Laidman, and the Blue Moon Fiber Arts Rockin' Sock Club.  I dropped the clubs for a while, although I did rejoin Janel's and actually kept up with the projects until the last one, when she disappeared due to a family emergency.  I tried to rejoin CookieA's sock club, but then she took off for a trip around the world.  Last year I rejoined the Rockin' Sock Club on something of a whim.  I didn't knit any of the shipments from last year, but decided to rejoin again this year - after pulling out all of the shipments and patterns from last year.  This is one of the patterns from last year's first shipment and is a Linen stitch cowl using two variegated skeins.
I had never done Linen stitch, so I swatched using the miniature "emergency" skeins that they include with each of their big skeins.  I really liked the resulting fabric.  And the colors, well.  That is one of the reasons that you join the Blue Moon Fiber Arts Rockin' Sock Club.  I think they should start an ad campaign - "The Most Interesting Knitter in the World" - and the tag line would be "I don't always knit socks, but when I do, I knit Socks That Rock.  Keep knitting my friends."  I started this as something that would be mostly mindless to work on when I didn't have Hale-Bopp to work on, but then, well, things happened, so I haven't made much progress on it.  The needle size threw me - a US 9 with fingering weight yarn?  I did do a little research to see if I could find anything on picking the right needle size for Linen stitch, but had no luck.  I even played around with smaller needles while I was swatching, but decided that the fabric looked best with the larger needle.

Pattern:  Morphology by A. Karen Alfke
Yarn:  Blue Moon Fiber Arts Socks that Rock Lightweight in Sprinkles and Shannanogins
Needle:  US 9 (5.5 mm)

Hale-Bopp MKAL - Slip Stitch Section Clue 1 - Slight Redo

As I was working on Clue 2 I realized that I had a mistake in the slip stitch section of Clue 1.  The floats from my last 3 rows of slipped stitches were lining up instead of being staggered.  This morning (after working the garter stitch and lace section of Clue 2) I spotted the mistake.  It had been bugging me all weekend and there was nothing for it but to rip back and fix it.  At least I only had to redo the last 4 rows of the slipped stitch section.  The first time I knit it I had the floats on the wrong side, literally.  But that is one of the things that I like about knitting, you can rip back and fix things, even if it takes multiple tries to do it (so long as your yarn holds up - but I don't usually knit with fibers that don't hold up to some handling).  There are so few things in life where you can get a do-over.

Here is the before picture - see those last couple of rows?
Yeah, they just bugged the heck out of me.  But things are all better now.  Well, except for the cast on of my test knit.  I was an idiot and did a long tail cast on, instead of a knitted cast on, or some other looser cast on.  I'm still trying to decide if I should rip it back and start over.  Knowing me, I probably will.

Pattern:  Hale-Bopp MKAL by Ambah O'Brien
Yarn:  Zen Yarn Garden Serenity 20
Needle:  US 5 (3.75 mm)