Saturday, February 6, 2016

Tudor Roses - Elizabeth Woodville - One Sleeve Done!

I have mostly been working on this project this week.  I started working the first sleeve this past Sunday, picking up 77 stitches around the edge of the armhole.  After finishing the short rows to work the sleeve cap I worked the sleeve straight until row 48, which is just past my bicep.  I have fairly muscular arms and I always have to adjust sleeve shaping to keep the upper sleeve from being too tight.  Once I hit row 48 I did my decreases every 6 rows.  This is a little closer than is typical for sleeve shaping, but I like how it worked out on this pattern - it looks very period appropriate.  When I got to the cuff I worked the short row shaping and did increases instead of decreases, since I was working top down instead of bottom up.  I did a picot bind off to match the picot cast on.  The sleeve fit is perfect, close but not snug, nicely conformal.  The picots flip up until they are blocked.  My yarn usage is looking good too.  I checked what I have left of the Red Rattle and I shouldn't run out, but I am glad that I bought an extra skein.  With these patterns I am always buying a little extra yarn, just to make sure I have enough.


Pattern:  Elizabeth Woodville, by Alice Starmore from Tudor Roses (2013 edition)
Yarn:  Alice Starmore Hebridean 2 Ply (277 g in Red Rattle & 50 g in Whin)
Needles:  US 3 (3.25 mm)

Sunday, January 31, 2016

Tudor Roses - Elizabeth Woodville - Body Done

Last weekend I raveled and reclaimed the yarn from my initial start.  With all of the snow we stayed home on Monday, so I was able to finish up the body increases and work the left front and get a good start on the back.  Yesterday I finished up the back and the right front and joined the shoulders.  I pinned it out and spritzed it last night so I could check the fit.  I am very happy with how this is coming along.  The fit is perfect, just the right amount of ease, and the length is good.  I extended the depth of the armhole and did short row shaping on the shoulders, joining them with three needle bind off.  I will now pick up stitches around the armhole so I can work top down set-in sleeves, my preferred method.  It is so exciting when a fitted pattern comes together like this.  All of the prep work that I did has really paid off, and I have learned so much.  I didn't even mind knitting the bottom part twice.  It is worth it to get the finished results that I want.  I now feel confident that I can work through all of the patterns in this book, which was my original intent when I first looked through it.  I already have the yarn for the second pattern, and I've been looking at the third pattern and thinking about colors.

Here is the view from the back.




I have become a real fan of pinning and spritzing a work in progress to get a quick check on fit and drape.  It provides many of the same benefits as a full blocking, but is so much quicker.


Pattern:  Elizabeth Woodville, by Alice Starmore from Tudor Roses (2013 edition)
Yarn:  Alice Starmore Hebridean 2 Ply (277 g in Red Rattle & 50 g in Whin)
Needles:  US 3 (3.25 mm)

Piglet Socks - Done!

I finished these up early yesterday afternoon while watching "For a Few Dollars More", the second film in the Man with No Name Trilogy.  I love those movies, Sergio Leone and Ennio Morricone are an amazing combination.  I think my favorite film of theirs is "Once Upon a Time in the West", which is truly operatic.  Once I finished up these socks I cast on the next pair and worked through the toe increases before setting them aside to work on my Elizabeth Woodville.  I haven't decided what to call them, so right now they are just "Basic Toe Up Socks 5".  I must confess that I'm not sure what I was thinking when I bought those skeins of self-striping yarn.  The color combinations are pretty wild.

Pattern:  Basic Toe-Up Sock from Custom Socks by Kate Atherley
Yarn:  Biscotte & Cie Felix
Needle:  US 1 (2.25 mm)

Saturday, January 30, 2016

Piglet Socks - Two Feet Done

Last weekend was a wonderful four-day long weekend of snow and knitting, but even when I went back to work I managed to get some knitting done during telecons and while reviewing a document.  I finished one sock on Wednesday and finished turning the heel of the second sock yesterday.  From the first sock that I knit I have always loved turning the heel, it still seems magical to me.  I am almost done with the second sock and will likely finish it up this morning.  The next cake of sock yarn is standing by to be cast on.

Pattern:  Basic Toe-Up Sock from Custom Socks by Kate Atherley
Yarn:  Biscotte & Cie Felix
Needle:  US 1 (2.25 mm)

Monday, January 25, 2016

Live Long and Prosper Tunic - Making Progress, Slowly

After pinning and spritzing my Elizabeth Woodville, I decided to pull out my Live Long and Prosper Tunic.  I figured this was the perfect mindless knitting to work on while watching football.  I do love the way this is turning out, but those rows are still long - I've only worked two sets of decreases.  I'm not working my decreases right on the side seams, but instead shifted them in so they are more like darts.  I thought it would make the tunic hang better.  After working with the Felix sock yarn and the Hebridean 2-ply, this yarn is so soft and silky, and very slippery. 

My Elizabeth Woodville is dry, and the fit looks good, so I will continue on with that.  I also reclaimed the yarn from my previous start and it is wound back into cakes and ready to be used.

Pattern:  Live Long and Prosper Tunic by Carolyn Blakelock
Yarn:  Fingering Merino Cashmere and Fingering Silky Cashmere by Sundara Yarns
Needle:  US 3 (3.25 mm)

Sunday, January 24, 2016

Tudor Roses - Elizabeth Woodville - Increases Halfway Done, Almost

After pinning and spritzing last time I tried the fit so far and decided that I really needed more ease in the hips and that I also wanted the peplum to extend further down from my waist.  The original pattern does not extend far past the waist, and given how high waisted I am, that makes for a pretty short torso.  I pulled the needles out of my knitting, and cast on again.  I decided to go up a size for the bottom part, and work all of the decreases.  I also worked 3 rows between each of the decreases, whereas the pattern has the last few decreases occurring every other row.  This allows me to extend the peplum further down, and makes the shaping a bit more gradual than the pattern.  I switched back to the smallest size for the increases, which means that I will only work 9 of the 12 increases.  This gets me to the correct stitch count for the bust measurement of the smallest size.  I am also spacing the increases out more, working 5 rows between the increases instead of 3.  I pinned and spritzed my progress today so I could check my fit again.  I have completed 4 of my 9 increases.  At some point I will ravel and reclaim the yarn from my previous effort.

Pattern:  Elizabeth Woodville, by Alice Starmore from Tudor Roses (2013 edition)
Yarn:  Alice Starmore Hebridean 2 Ply (277 g in Red Rattle & 50 g in Whin)
Needles:  US 3 (3.25 mm)

Friday, January 22, 2016

Piglet Socks - One Foot Done

Of course, once I bound off my Summer Breeze socks and I had to cast on another pair.  I grabbed the next cake of Felix and was confronted with the question of what to name the project.  The colors reminded me of Piglet, from Winnie the Pooh, so that is what I called them.  We had all of the stuffed animals when I was growing up.  Pooh was much loved, and a little the worse for wear.  Kanga was disemboweled by our dog Minnie, so Roo ended up an orphan.  Tigger was not a plushy, he was small and firm and his body was filled with sawdust - a fact I discovered when his head came off.  Piglet had cardboard pieces in his feet so he could sort of stand up on his own.  He provided my sister Liz her first opportunity at small animal surgery when the cardboard pieces shifted in his feet, and one of his ears started to come off.  I'm happy to say the surgery was a complete success and she is now an extremely good small animal vet.

Pattern:  Basic Toe-Up Sock from Custom Socks by Kate Atherley
Yarn:  Biscotte & Cie Felix
Needle:  US 1 (2.25 mm)